Lived experience of disability and coronavirus: Negotiating structural injustice

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This blog will focus on some of my recent personal experiences and reflections of living through Coronavirus.  It uses the lens of structural injustice as recently outlined by Powers and Faden (2019) as a means to manage resistance in a sustainable way.

Lived experience

I think it is fair to say that I am always aware of the responsibility I have in various ways.  I feel compelled to make a difference, and to use the modest platform I have in order to do so. Set against a backdrop of Coronavirus, the numerous impacts of which have been well documented for disabled people, this responsibility has never felt greater.

So much so, that at times, it has felt overwhelming. I have had to find a way to be able to try and make a difference in a sustainable way, whilst recognising that, unfortunately there are all too real limits to what I can achieve.  This has been a painful process.  At times I have only been able to sit and worry about where we are and where we are headed, knowing that the world ahead will only be a more bumpy one to say the least.

Structural Injustice

Coronavirus has highlighted many things, and for me, one of those things has been that not all societies are created equally.  It is only through critically analysing the structural forces at play that societal landscape can be best understood.  Taken at face value without unpicking the underlying influences, there is a risk that action may actually perpetuate problems as opposed to addressing them.

Critical times need critical thinking.  Structural injustice, as explored by Powers and Faden (2019) is an important analytical device in our metaphorical toolbox.  I will caveat this by saying that what follows is a very coarse sketch of a complex concept.  Nonetheless, even my rudimentary understanding is, I hope, a useful one.

Structural injustice is defined as:

“unfair patterns of advantage and unfair relations of power including subordination, exploitation and social exclusion, as well as human rights violations and depravations in well – being that contribute to and grow out of unjust social structural conditions” (Powers and Faden 2019:1)

With its sweeping impacts, coronavirus creates the perfect climate for structural injustice to thrive – highlighting in particular patterns economic and political disadvantage.  In such conditions it also becomes harder for typically marginalised voices to be heard.  In other words, I view this as meaning resistance also assumes a greater level of importance.

Resistance and negotiation of structural injustice

In stark terms, the resistance offered may be in statistical terms simply staying alive for disabled people. Thankfully I have observed more developed forms of this amongst the broad church that is the disability community.

At a personal level, finding forms of resistance that are sustainable has been especially important during a long lasting period of time self isolating, which, unfortunately has no end in sight.

Powers and Faden name several forms of resistance but I think simple acts, such as finding solidarity amongst each other are missing.  As is a detailed analysis of disability in Powers and Faden’s otherwise excellent text. 

For me, there is also a balance to be found between resistance, compliance and discipline.  An act of personal resistance would have been to disregard the current climate and live the life I did before the pandemic.  That did not feel the right way forward for me though – so I have had to find ways to carve out new forms of personal discipline.  This may be a perfect juncture to introduce Foucault, but I will resist the temptation to do so.

At an every day level, maintaining a sense of wellbeing is also critical during the present times.  In terms of my lived experience this has meant focusing on ways in which I can make a difference, whilst acknowledging that there will be battles that will have to be left for another day.

It is crucial though that we use a critical lens, such as that offered by structural injustice, in order to take and make decisions in the best, most inclusive way we can.  This also means using the power of lived experience to help shape the way forward, and in so doing, make inroads into structural sources of exclusion.

About the Author

Dr Chris Whitaker is a disability blogger who writes on impairment related issues.