Establishing Marathon Pace – reflections on the first month of PIP stories

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We’ve come a long, long way together
Through the hard times and the good
I have to celebrate you…
I have to praise you like I should

These are the opening lyrics to ‘Praise You’ by Fatboy Slim.  These lyrics sum up what has been a frenetic first month on the PIP Stories trail.  I want to give praise to all of you who have helped in a collective effort to date, as we have come a long way already.  That I write this on a new computer purchased to keep up with the rigours of this work is also partly testament to that!

In this first month, over 500 PIP stories have been received.  Each one has its own take on the PIP process. Individually and collectively they raise some huge issues and point to a live and ongoing issue for so many people.  I have been moved and surprised by the wide ranging impacts that the PIP process has, and continues to have for the many people I have spoken with on an individual and organisational level.  Efforts must continue to be addressed at achieving positive changes, and the PIP stories work is one such effort, picking up on the hard work of so many before me which it is only fair to acknowledge.

Though there has been a lot achieved in a space of time, there is also a lot to do.  This is where finding a sustainable marathon pace comes in.  Drawing on my previous experience of undertaking qualitative research, I have thought carefully about the methods used and arrangements to set up to support this work, which I hope will make it as robust as it can be.  For me, this includes debriefing and supervision from a trained professional.  In one of my supervision sessions, we talked about the importance of this work being sustainable, and setting achievable short, medium and long term goals.  I have no doubt that in order to achieve the positive changes I would like to see will take a long time.  A pace must be set to achieve this.  Usain Bolt, I am not, and never will be.  Usain is many things, but a marathon runner in not one of them. This work needs carefully pacing, and is certainly not a sprint.

Experience tells me that time will be needed – even if via pausing to think and reflect.  Regular readers of these updates will know that I am using a piece of software to identify the emerging themes from the accounts I have been sent.  This process, even with a speedy new computer, takes time and requires a careful and considered approach.  In taking this care, I also aim to do justice to those who have taken the time and trouble to share their stories with me.  As I know from my own experiences of the PIP process, shared via this blog, telling your story isn’t always easy.  I hope though that it will make a difference.  I know that every story recieved helps to add to the power of what is being put together here.  That is also why I am asking for more stories to be shared and will continue to do so.  Discussions also continue behind the scenes to ensure that word is spread as far and wide as we can get it, and I remain very grateful and humbled for the support and encouragement received to date.

It will take time to run our marathon course, but I am determined to go the distance, and achieve the positive changes that are needed to this process.

You can share your PIP story (including anonymously) here.  Every story counts.


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About the Author

Chris Whitaker was born and grew up in Cheshire, arriving in the world with cerebral palsy after a complex childbirth. Apparently, he was lucky to be here at all and has tried to make the most of life ever since! Chris has worked in the third sector for a few years now and is also a charity trustee. Making a positive difference every day is what drives him and he gets to see the impact the third sector makes. Chris has also been able to use his own lived experience as a disabled person to make an input into his working life.

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